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may be offensive. c-span: at what point did you decide to do a documentary on the detroit? >> guest: i'm from the area. i was born and raised in the dietrich areas of there was a personal connection. i never considered making a film in detroit or with any personal ties to myself whatsoever. but my co-director and body, rachel, started talking about the city of detroit in late 2008, because i would return home and things seemed to be getting worse and worse. it was all pretty bad when i grew up there in the 80's. so to see the crisis spread out further and further into the suburbs and a lot of people i knew were leaving and we started discussing what was the future of this place, but wouldn't like, then in october of 2009i came with my crew for three days as an experiment and filmed in a city just as an outsider and talked to a few people and absolutely riveted by the people and the place. and i thought there's definitely a movie here. i'm not sure what it is that we need to make a film and in detroit. c-span: i read that you're father had an impact on you and his business is over the y
of detroit of their pensions. they worked hard for these pensions. [applause] and let me tell you something, if they, if we stand by while they take the detroiters pensions, they'll be taking our pensions. so don't think it won't happen to us. if they can set a precedent, they'll do it to us again. you know, let me just tell you this: inequality is a scourge on our society. and, yes, we're talking about low-wage workers making $7.25 an hour, we've got to do something about it. but there's the other side of that, the other side of that is that some people are doing pretty good. so between 1979 and 2007, 20, you know, a period of a it little bit less than 20 years, real income rose by 240% for those at the top 1. it's a shameful thing. it is a moral issue. and we have got to fight back at this. let me tell you this, our economy is capable be of producing -- capable of producing enough good paying jobs for everyone. [applause] our economy can do it. this economy can do it. but we can't do it while we're getting trade deals that are shipping our jobs overseas that just leaned on us if a few mon
and the loss of more than half of detroit's population as a result. 8:00 eastern, booktv in prime time. tonight the focus on book fairs and festivals of the past year, including a discussion from the harlem book fair, and a look at the book, "stalin secrets," author ann romney and a book about whitty bulger. we'll -- >> i'm not some sort of anti-suburb person who thinks everyone needs to live in new york city and, you know i was very sensitive to be coming across as a sort of a espresso-sipping, condo-dwelling elitist of sometime. that is not why i did this book. i understand why people like the suburbs. i get fed up with a lot of daily life in new york city a lot. i was more drawn, the trend were so undeniable. the fact there is a shift the way suburban america perceived by people that live there is too big of a story to ignore. >> the earliest extent letter we have, dates to october 1762 and we call it the miss adorable letter because that is how john adams opens the letter. so it is john writing to abigail and he says, miss adorable, by the same token that the bearer here of sat up with laws
of when they think of boston politics. >> what other races are you keeping an eye on? >> one is detroit. field ofthis candidates narrowed in a runoff to just two contenders for a job which is very important right now. the election itself may be less important compared to what happens after the election. how much power the mayor will even have when there is an emergency manager with sweeping authority. there is also houston. a democratic mayor is running a republicanerm opponent. she was elected mayor of houston, it became the largest american city with an openly gay mayor. you wouldy necessarily stereotype houston, texas. texas, it is worth keeping an eye on what happens there. if you cover politics and policy in this era of budget -- >> you cover politics and policy. what can mayor is expected from washington regarding infant -- regarding infrastructure, the nuts and bolts. >> you talk to mirrors over the country -- you talk to mi ayors and they are fed up with how little support they get from washington. certainty.ally no stimulusof ways, the that a lot of folks credit with helping gi
was identified at from detroit. heron and morris are on the ballot to be recalled because of deep objections by their constituents to particularly the gun grabbing votes that they cast some would say at the behest of the new york mayor michael bloomberg in this last legislative session. it's never been in the history of colorado that state legislators have been fired by we the people on the recall in midterm. that's what he means about september 10th. >> indeed. [applause] >> i think it's interesting just on the topic of new york city that you have a mayor now that is like a slurpee grabber and might be replaced by the most famous amateur photographer. >>> we will have more on the future of the political party tonight on c-span town hall. these programs and a variety of topics air live each tuesday, wednesday and thursday from seven to 9 p.m. eastern throughout the congressional recess. republican national committee chairman rights on the rising stars program today on the meeting in boston. we will have that live on c-span this morning at 11:15 eastern canadian alliance for health reform hol
million of our residents are on food stamps today. one in three households in detroit, according to the associated press, four out of five u.s. adults struggle with joblessness, near porveghts or reliance on welfare. there's no shortage of labor in the united states. there is a shortage of jobs in the united states. our goal must be to help our struggling americans move from dependency to independence, to help them find steady jobs and rising pay, not declining pay. our policy cannot be to simply relegate more and more of our citizens to dependence on the government while importing a steady stream of foreign workers to take the available jobs. that is not in the interest of our country or the people of this country. some contend our unemployed don't have the needed skills. well, let's train them. we now spend over $750 billion a year on means-tested welfare assistance-type programs. that's the largest item in the budget, bigger than social security, bigger than defense, bigger than medicare. and of that amount, we spend about -- for every $100 we spend on those programs, we only
for the cluster. we've got an mp unit out of detroit, michigan, that is providing force protection. there's a large number of individual augments and smaller reserve units. you'll be happy to know that my standards questions today after i get done with business were are you a member of the reserve officers' association, and have you paid your dues? [laughter] most would look at me a bit curious, and when i get done i said, well, i'm going to be speaking to the reserve officers' association, and for effect, i pulled out my notebook, and i said i'm taking names. [laughter] so for the next few days, your membership committee is busier than usual, i'm going to take a little bit of credit for that. [applause] but, frankly, beyond letting you know that your reservists and guardsmen should be making you proud, there's a more important reason that i'm glad to speak about afghanistan, such an influential and engaged group of leaders. i've got a great deal of optimism about where we are in the campaign right now. there are challenges, to be sure, and i'll address those. but we have a very real oppo
, but treating affects down here. and the most dramatic example of that, of course, is stuxnet which detroit about 1000 centrifuges. stuxnet almost what i conducted by a nationstate because it's too complicated to be done in a garage or in your basement, all right? look, given my background, former director of cia, i think it's absolute unavoidable good. but i'll describe what i just described to you in just like they did forward. somewhat almost certain initiative during a time of these just use a cyber weapon to destroy another nation's critical infrastructure. ouch. that's a big deal. you may or may not see me making a comment on 60 mins about a year and a half ago in which i can characterize that as somebody crossing a river gone, got a leaking on the other side of the river, and life will be very different. so those are your sins. stealing your stuff, disrupting the network, destroying their infrastructure. who are the sinners? nationstates. you know that. criminal elements, and then finally this third group that it would have trouble defining, nihilists, anarchists, activists, losec, a
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8